alienating alienating  /ˈeɪ li ə ˌneɪ tɪŋ/

Definition(s):

  • (adj) causing hostility or loss of friendliness

Usage(s):

  1. Play dirty without alienating his party.
  2. But there is something alienating about it, maybe because it fails to fulfill its possibly loony intellectual aspirations.
  3. The most stupid mistake a counter-insurgency operation can make is alienating the population.

News

  1. Apple event: New software, MacBooks, music

    Apple is expected to show off a simplified look on iPhones and iPads. While design modifications could help Apple distinguish its devices from rival phones and tablets, they risk alienating longtime users.
    on June 10, 2013     Source: KING5 Seattle

  2. Bret Baier: If Obama Prosecutes NSA Leaker Edward Snowden, He ‘Opens The Door To Libertarian’ Movement

    Fox News Channel’s Special Report anchor Bret Baier joined the hosts of Fox & Friends on Monday to discuss the revelations surrounding Edward Snowden , a private security contractor who came out over the weekend as the person who leaked classified National Security Agency protocols to The Guardian . Baier said that prosecuting Snowden risks alienating bipartisan swaths of the American electorate ...
    on June 10, 2013     Source: Mediaite

Quotes

  1. "So we have illegal militia in the southern part of the country that really are acting as criminal elements that are pressing the people down there and, in good measure, as we've seen, alienating the Iraqis from Iran," Hadley said in an...
    on Apr 12, 2008 By: Stephen Hadley Source: International Herald Tribune

  2. "Inviting him and then turning around and alienating and insulting an entire nation whose representative this man happens to be is simply inappropriate," Dabashi said.
    on Sep 24, 2007 By: Hamid Dabashi Source: Forbes

  3. Serwotka said after the vote: "At a time when the Labour government is at its least popular, they are further alienating their own workforce with a policy of pay freezes and pay cuts. Pay in the civil service is among the lowest in the public...
    on May 21, 2008 By: Mark Serwotka Source: guardian.co.uk

Word of the Day
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/ˈɪn tə ɡrəl /