intruding intruding  /ɪn ˈtru dɪŋ/

Definition(s):

  • (adj) projecting inward

Usage(s):

  1. Though Washington has stayed quiet about the current trial, France has carefully positioned the case to withstand charges that it is intruding in matters of faith.
  2. Bush said science would guide his decisions, but those in the lab see ideology intruding on their work.
  3. Even if one of Kirtland's lasers did not damage an intruding aircraft, it could blind any pilot or passenger who looked directly into it.

News

Quotes

  1. As Frank Lowy, the chairman of Football Federation Australia, pointed out: "The bottom line is we reject the notion of another country playing a round of their domestic league in Australia and intruding on the development of the A-League."
    on Feb 15, 2008 By: Frank Lowy Source: Guardian Unlimited

  2. "The bottom line is, FFA rejects the notion of another country playing a round of their domestic competition in Australia and intruding on the development of the A-League and the game in Australia," Lowy said.
    on Feb 13, 2008 By: Ben Buckley Source: The Standard

  3. "When most people think of health care reform they think of more doctors exams, not more IRS exams," says US Congressman Kevin Brady, the top House Republican on the Joint Economic Committee. "Isn't the federal government already intruding...
    on Mar 21, 2010 By: Kevin Brady Source: Men's News Daily

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