orb orb  /ˈɔrb/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) the ball-shaped capsule containing the vertebrate eye
  2. (n) an object with a spherical shape
  3. (v) move in an orbit

Synonym(s)

Usage(s):

  1. The new puzzle is a transparent orb consisting of three spheres and six colored balls that must be maneuvered into color-coded domes.
  2. The orb can be wirelessly configured to track any individual stock, any market index or your personal portfolio.
  3. Other telescopes had already spotted the silhouette of the Jupiter-size orb as it repeatedly passed in front of its parent star.

News

  1. Round 3 for Orb, Oxbow In Crowded Belmont Stakes

    When Kentucky Derby winner Orb and Preakness winner read more
    on June 14, 2013     Source: Times Newsweekly

  2. The Rail: After a Taxing Campaign, Orb Enjoys a Relaxing Retreat

    Like a city kid at summer camp, the Kentucky Derby winner Orb appears to have settled in nicely at Fair Hill Equine Therapy Center in Maryland.        
    on June 12, 2013     Source: New York Times

  3. Kentucky Derby winner Orb faces a friend in the Preakness

    BALTIMORE — Kentucky Derby winner Orb and Illinois Derby champion Departing played together as foals in the lush pastures of Claiborne Farm in central Kentucky.
    on June 11, 2013     Source: Berkshire Eagle

Quotes

  1. "Orb has the opportunity to set the pace in the exciting new world of digital media convergence," said Costello. "Consumers are realizing they can enjoy their digital media anytime, anywhere with Orb and the growth is explosive. Together with...
    on Jan 2, 2007 By: Joseph Costello Source: Yahoo! News (press release)

  2. "I've just started work on an album with David Gilmour from Pink Floyd which I think every Orb and Pink Floyd fan will want to hear," The Orb's Alex Paterson told British magazine The List recently.
    on Oct 2, 2009 By: Alex Paterson Source: ChartAttack

  3. In the first century AD, the Greek historian Plutarch wrote about it in "De Facie de Orb Lunae" ("On the Face of the Moon"), when he hypothesized that the dark areas we see were seas.
    on Nov 24, 2009 By: Plutarch Source: New York Times

Word of the Day
infatuated infatuated
/ɪn ˈfæ tʃu ˌeɪ tɪd /