carotid carotid  /kə ˈrɑ tɪd/

Definition(s):

  • (adj) of or relating to either of the two major arteries supplying blood to the head and neck

Usage(s):

  1. One doctor felt a faint carotid pulse, another felt a femoral pulse.
  2. Discovered in 1743, it is called the carotid body, or glomus caroticum; there is one on each side of the neck.
  3. Last October, they operated on the carotid artery on the left side of Kennedy's neck to clear the plaque that was building up inside it.

News

  1. UH Case Medical Center Among First to Enroll Patients for Global Carotid Artery Trial

    Physicians at University Hospitals Case Medical Center enrolled their first patients in the ROADSTER Study, a global, multicenter clinical trial evaluating a novel, less-invasive procedure to help clear blockages in carotid arteries and prevent strokes.
    on June 20, 2013     Source: Newswise

  2. Michigan Vascular Center, McLaren-Flint taking part in global clinical trial for carotid artery treatment

    The Michigan Vascular Center and McLaren-Flint are among 25 sites taking part in a global clinical trial for a new medical procedure that takes away the risks and scarring of major surgery while providing a more effective way to treat carotid artery disease.
    on June 16, 2013     Source: The Flint Journal

Quotes

  1. "Our study has shown that the presence of a carotid bruit significantly increased the likelihood of cardiovascular death or heart attack," Christopher Pickett from the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, wrote in the journal report.
    on May 8, 2008 By: Walter Reed Source: Bloomberg

  2. "His carotid artery was throbbing in his neck," Fitzgerald told the court.
    on Dec 18, 2007 By: Patrick Fitzgerald Source: CBS2 Chicago

  3. "It was scary, especially since I was getting headaches and dizziness and I wasn't sure why," Aulin said. "I wasn't hit on the head. But it was because the carotid artery was swollen [and not properly supplying blood to the brain]."
    on Sep 20, 2007 By: Jared Aulin Source: Globe and Mail

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