malnourishment malnourishment

Definition(s):

  • (n) not having enough food to develop or function normally

Usage(s):

  1. In the great drought of 1888, a third of the population is said to have died from malnourishment and disease.
  2. Five years ago, 13 babies died of malnourishment in coastal Fujian province after they were fed formula that contained little or no nutritional value.
  3. If he or she is too small, it can be a sign of chronic malnourishment.

News

  1. 2 out of 3 People Face Hunger as Haiti Woes Mount

    Two-thirds of Haiti's people face hunger and malnourishment as problems worsen in storms' wake        
    on June 10, 2013     Source: ABC News

  2. 5 Ideas For Improving Global Food Security, From University Students

    The finalists in the Thought for Food Challenge have some helpful ideas on how we’re going to feed everyone in the world, from reclaiming land to building vertical farms. If we’re going to feed 9 billion people by 2050, humanity is going to need some new ideas. Current practices--which lead to over-farming and obesity in one part of the world, and under-development and malnourishment in another ...
    on June 7, 2013     Source: Fast Company Magazine

Quotes

  1. "This plan is about reducing potential pain, malnourishment and discomfort for older Australians," the Minister for Ageing, Mrs Justine Elliot said.
    on Mar 1, 2009 By: Justine Elliot Source: Australia.TO

  2. At his news conference, Mr. Jaafari said the troops who stormed the building found "signs of malnourishment" among the 173 men and teenage boys, and that "there was some talk that they had been tortured."
    on Nov 15, 2005 By: Ibrahim al-Jaafari Source: New York Times

  3. Bjorn Lomborg, author of A Sceptical Environmentalist, said: "The Nobel Prize committee should have focused on the other great forgotten problems like malnourishment, malaria, the lack of free trade in farming, rather than climate change."
    on Oct 13, 2007 By: Bjorn Source: Melbourne Herald Sun

Word of the Day
fathom fathom
/ˈfæ ðəm /