loath loath  /ˈloʊθ/

Definition(s):

  1. (adj) unwillingness to do something contrary to your custom
  2. (adj) (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed

Usage(s):

  1. Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom has a habit of treading where other elected officials are loath to go.
  2. As Li prepares for a nationwide tour with the other finalists, her handlers are loath to discuss the political dimensions of the program or of Li's triumph.
  3. Until outlays sunk into the careers of rookies have been amortized, producers are loath to cut them a bigger piece of the pie.

News

  1. Will Obama reconsider arming Syrian rebels? This week could be key.

    President Obama has long been loath to arm Syrian rebels, worried that the weapons could fall into extremists' hands. But with the rebels faltering, he could reconsider.
    on June 12, 2013     Source: The Christian Science Monitor

  2. Short stories on summer reading list

    Short stories are like Brussels sprouts, says Mark LaFramboise, head buyer for Washington's Politics and Prose bookstore: After you've disliked one, you're loath to try another. Yet "at the moment, we're rich with a lot of really talented short-story writers, so it's a good reason to explore the realm.
    on June 11, 2013     Source: Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

  3. Return of the liberal-tarians

    But prospects for any bill look dim, as congressional leaders seem loath to curb the NSA's power.
    on June 9, 2013     Source: Politico

Quotes

  1. "Love me or loath me the Australian people know where I stand on all the major issues of importance to their future," said Howard, who is danger of losing in his own Sydney-based seat.
    on Oct 13, 2007 By: John Howard Source: Reuters UK

  2. Asked about the possibility of an extension in early May, Gates said he would "be loath to do that."
    on Jul 3, 2008 By: Robert Gates Source: Detroit Free Press

  3. "He was loath to and couldn't quite incorporate the idea that his daughter was gone, and so, he would set the table for two," Ablow said.
    on Jun 4, 2009 By: Dr Keith Ablow Source: FOXNews

Word of the Day
nebulous nebulous
/ˈnɛb jə ləs /