digression digression  /daɪ ˈɡrɛ ʃən/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) a message that departs from the main subject
  2. (n) a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern)
  3. (n) wandering from the main path of a journey

Usage(s):

  1. The only such FBI incident of meddling in political affairs cited in the Eisenhower years, this was no more than an un solicited digression by Hoover.
  2. First, in a digression on a digression, a tangent to these tangents, I extend thanks on behalf of the family to Tom Brady and Drew Bledsoe.
  3. The teacher orders the students to yell out the word digression! whenever a speech loses focus or direction.

News

  1. Why did John Roberts rule for sex workers?

    Hint: His seemingly progressive digression belies a long game that could thwart major liberal goals        
    on June 21, 2013     Source: Salon.com

  2. Would you pay $50 for 'World War Z'?

    (But first, a brief digression: Last night, I attended a screaming, er, screening of “Monsters University.” It was, as you might imagine for a Pixar movie, packed with kids, and the kiddie radio station sponsoring the screening had some, um, entertaining ideas. “At the count of thr
    on June 18, 2013     Source: Seattle Times

Quotes

  1. "Even though it's a very long book, I don't think the amount of story is considerably more than any other book," Goldenberg says. "There's a lot of wonderful digression and wonderful details and side journeys, but when you boil it down to the...
    on Jul 11, 2007 By: Michael Goldenberg Source: Montreal Gazette (subscription)

  2. As he has written elsewhere, Yagoda believes "that the world and language are multifarious, knotty, and illuminated by digression."
    on Feb 11, 2007 By: Ben Yagoda Source: The News Journal

  3. "Here, a short digression is necessary", says Hugo in the antepenultimate, 358th chapter.
    on Sep 24, 2008 By: Victor Hugo Source: Times Online

Word of the Day
ennui ennui
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