compress compress  /ˈkɑm prɛs/

Definition(s):

  1. (v) make more compact by or as if by pressing
  2. (v) squeeze or press together
  3. (n) a cloth pad or dressing (with or without medication) applied firmly to some part of the body (to relieve discomfort or reduce fever)

Usage(s):

  1. Some form of energy is required to compress the air.
  2. Yes, the technology exists to compress the DL DVDs to 4.
  3. MANY sports bras just compress the chest to prevent uncomfortable jiggling.

News

  1. CPR training starts Saturday

    The American Legion Post 34 is hosting three compression-only CPR training sessions Saturday as part of the Project Heart Start New Mexico.
    on June 20, 2013     Source: Alamogordo Daily News

  2. Caesium can batch compress JPEGS by up to 90%

    When you save a JPEG it’s easy to just accept your default image options, click File > Save and get on with your next task. But that probably means you’ll always be using the same JPEG compression level, and unless you’ve tuned this to an optimum figure, your final images could be anything up to ten times larger than they need to be. Could this be a problem for you? The open source Caesium ...
    on June 17, 2013     Source: BetaNews

Quotes

  1. "Well, you saw the kickoffs, the field goals, the punts," Tynes said of the effect the cold had on the ball, which fluttered oddly most of the night. "It's like kicking cardboard almost. It doesn't compress off your foot like it normally...
    on Jan 20, 2008 By: Lawrence Tynes Source: Newsday

  2. "Compressed sensing is a different strategy," Dr. Tao said. "You also compress the data, but you try to do it in a very dumb way, one that doesn't require much computer power at the sensor end."
    on Mar 12, 2007 By: Terence Tao Source: New York Times

  3. Sir James Dyson, the founder of the company, said: "It took us five years to painstakingly compress and rebuild every single component before we had a machine that was a third smaller than its predecessor, yet could still tackle dirt like bigger...
    on Jan 21, 2010 By: James Dyson Source: Telegraph.co.uk

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