carnation carnation  /kɑr ˈneɪ ʃən/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) Eurasian plant with pink to purple-red spice-scented usually double flowers; widely cultivated in many varieties and many colors
  2. (n) a pink or reddish-pink color
  3. (adj) pink or pinkish

Usage(s):

  1. There Partner Felix Warburg, a carnation in his buttonhole, summons the eleven partners to conference punctually at 11 a.
  2. He always sports a deep red carnation in his buttonhole, tucks an expensive handspun, monogrammed linen handkerchief in the pocket beneath it.
  3. Fashions in snobbery change, but the green carnation and the ashcan lids are interchangeable as disengaged scoffing at the everyday business of living.

News

  1. 2013 Mazda MX-5 roadster

    CARNATION, Wash. -- We're cinched hard in the driver's seat of Mazda's MX-5 convertible roadster, left hand gripping a leather-bound steering wheel while the right one plies a stubby shifter stick, right foot rocking between throttle and brake pedals in racer style while our left foot pumps a tight clutch for some testing of chassis dynamics in a new Club edition of 2013.
    on June 20, 2013     Source: Carlist

  2. Softball scores 6-18-13

    Carnation
    on June 18, 2013     Source: The Journal Times

  3. In Hanover, ‘Some Day We’ll Touch the Sun’

    Social Studies teacher Liz Murray pins on a maroon and white carnation onto Suriya Lacy's gown before Hanover's Graduation at Hanover HIgh School in Hanover, N.H., on June 14, 2013.
    on June 15, 2013     Source: Valley News

Quotes

  1. "Digger had the green carnation on," said Calhoun, laughing. "He's the guy who's going to be objective?"
    on Jan 25, 2009 By: Jim Calhoun Source: Hartford Courant

  2. "That red piece is supposed to represent the petal of a carnation," Mr. Craxi said in an interview, indicating a messy blotch on his redesigned party symbol. "But it looks more like a blood stain from the political stabbing I've taken."
    on Apr 7, 2006 By: Bettino Craxi Source: Wall Street Journal

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