interrogate interrogate  /ɪn ˈtɛ rə ˌɡeɪt/

Definition(s):

  1. (v) transmit (a signal) for setting off an appropriate response, as in telecommunication
  2. (v) pose a series of questions to

Usage(s):

  1. Alexander didn't do anything for months but eat, sleep and interrogate prisoners.
  2. The Yugoslav state security agency, UDBA, was cut back by 5,000 cops, and deprived of its power to interrogate suspects outside of court.
  3. Simply stated, SERE school does not train you on how to interrogate, and things you 'learn' there by osmosis about interrogation are probably wrong if copied by interrogators.

News

  1. Suspect in deaths of 4 women says police coerced statement from him

    James Brown, accused in the 2011 deaths of four women he met through a classified advertising website, said he gave a statement to police after they threatened to charge and interrogate his mother.
    on June 21, 2013     Source: Detroit Free Press

  2. Journalists Explore Climate Complexity

    There is much to recommend this article in the New Republic by Nate Cohn, starting with the sub-headline: Grappling with climate change nuance in a toxic political environment It is an ungrateful task to interrogate the complexities of climate change (which extend to the policy side of the equation) so props to Cohn for taking it on. That he does so with an even tone and lucid writing makes the ...
    on June 19, 2013     Source: Discover

Quotes

  1. "It's no secret that the president approved a lawful program in order to interrogate hardened terrorists," Perino said. "We do not torture. We also know that this program has saved lives by disrupting terrorist attacks."
    on Dec 11, 2007 By: Dana Perino Source: Forbes

  2. "In order to protect this country, we must be able to interrogate people who have information about future attacks," Bush said at the White House. "I will resist any bill that does not enable this program to go forward."
    on Sep 14, 2006 By: President Bush Source: USA Today

  3. "Our ability to interrogate high-value detainees like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed - that's been a very important tool that we've had to be able to secure the nation," said Mr Cheney.
    on Oct 27, 2006 By: Vice President Dick Cheney Source: guardian.co.uk

Word of the Day
periphery periphery
/pə ˈrɪ fə ri /