full-time full-time

Definition(s):

  1. (adj) for the entire time appropriate to an activity
  2. (adv) for the standard number of hours

Antonyms(s)

Usage(s):

  1. Economists use this term to describe part-time or full-time jobs typically held for less than 10 years following full-time careers.
  2. In 1978, full-time women workers earned just 61% of what full-time men did, compared to 79% now.
  3. The original version of this article incorrectly stated that store owner Butch Fleming laid off all his full-time employees in reaction to slumping sales figures.

News

  1. Westminster to get full-time deputy patrol from Sheriff's Department

    WESTMINSTER -- The Windham County Sheriff's Department has entered into a contract with the town of Westminster to provide 40 hours of patrol services every week via a full-time deputy.
    on June 22, 2013     Source: Brattleboro Reformer

  2. Angelina College is accepting applications for the following full-time positions:

    Angelina College is accepting applications for the following full-time positions: Retention Specialist/Nursing Skills Laboratory Assistant, Automotive Instructor, Director of Technology- Workforce, and Coordinator of Tutoring and Special Accommodations Center and a Part-Time Distance Learning Lab Technician - Mornings. Complete job and application information can be found at the Angelina College ...
    on June 22, 2013     Source: The Daily Sentinel

  3. Wanted full-time EXPERIENCED landscapers

    Wanted full-time EXPERIENCED landscapers looking to further their career with a great local company. Please call 218-547-4647.
    on June 19, 2013     Source: The Pilot-Independent

Quotes

  1. "I told Peter Magowan, 'If I'm a part-time player, I'm still better than your full-time player, and it's a wise idea to keep me,'" Bonds said. "We still have time. Things might change."
    on Oct 24, 2007 By: Barry Bonds Source: USA Today

  2. "I feel that he has let the armed forces down by not appointing a secretary of state who is full-time," Boyce said...
    on Nov 23, 2007 By: Lord Boyce Source: guardian.co.uk

Word of the Day
cursory cursory
/ˈkɜr sə ri /