laudable laudable  /ˈlɔ də bəl/

Definition(s):

  • (adj) worthy of high praise

Usage(s):

  1. While that may be laudable in humanitarian terms, Bruni's defense of a convicted Red Brigade terrorist struck some as the summit of hypocrisy and indecency.
  2. A laudable goal for all nations on earth, perhaps, but one that would make those four New Zealanders playing for Japan a little tough to explain.
  3. It was a stunning intrusion on congressional turf, and a laudable one; the jetties would have ravaged the Outer Banks at a cost of more than $500,000 per boat.

News

Quotes

  1. "Good intentions and laudable goals are small compensation to the families, farmers and ranchers who are being hurt by the federal government's efforts to trade food for fuel," said Perry. "Congress specifically created an emergency waiver...
    on Aug 7, 2008 By: Rick Perry Source: CNNMoney.com

  2. "Throughout this campaign, Fred Thompson brought a laudable focus to the challenges confronting our country and the solutions necessary to meet them," Romney said in a statement. "He stood for strong conservative ideas and believed strongly...
    on Jan 22, 2008 By: Mitt Romney Source: Guardian Unlimited

  3. As it branded the raising of the tax level for the low paid "unreasonable", John McFall, its chairman, said: "While tax simplification is a laudable aim, it seems strange that the abolition of the 10p starting rate of income tax disadvantages mainly...
    on Apr 6, 2008 By: John McFall Source: The Herald

Word of the Day
infatuated infatuated
/ɪn ˈfæ tʃu ˌeɪ tɪd /