fervor fervor  /ˈfɜr vər/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) feelings of great warmth and intensity
  2. (n) the state of being emotionally aroused and worked up

Usage(s):

  1. The volunteer appealed with fervor to the people to donate generously for the riot victims.
  2. With the World Cup football round the corner, the fans are cheering their respective teams with renewed fervor.
  3. The neighboring country rebuffed the peace overtures with rhetoric and fervor.

News

  1. Patriots continue minicamp with smaller Tebow crowd

    The Patriots continued minicamp on Wednesday with the fervor over new quarterback Tim Tebow beginning to subside.        
    on June 13, 2013     Source: Boston Globe

  2. Getting the fix out of sports

    The nearly religious fervor that cricket in India produces among its fans puts to shame America’s fascination with football or baseball. So a developing major scandal there that involves the fixing of matches is serious business – so serious that one retired cricket official has called for all the top professional matches held in 2013 thus far to be reviewed for tampering.
    on June 11, 2013     Source: Christian Science Monitor via Yahoo! News

  3. Hezbollah entry in Syria fans Shiite-Sunni fires

    CAIRO (AP) — The Egyptian cleric was in a fervor. With Hezbollah's Shiite fighters helping Bashar Assad crush Syrian rebels, he wanted to sound the alarm to Sunnis across the Middle East: "Now is the time for jihad."
    on June 8, 2013     Source: Associated Press via Yahoo! News

Quotes

  1. "The significant rise in purchases of homes for investment since 2001 seems to have charged some regional markets with speculative fervor," Greenspan said.
    on Jul 20, 2005 By: Alan Greenspan Source: San Diego Union Tribune

  2. "It's obviously a huge rivalry . . . a renewed fervor between both these towns," Jackson said. "It's something that has been anticipated the last couple of weeks, so here it is."
    on May 29, 2010 By: Phil Jackson Source: Los Angeles Times

  3. "While alcoholic beverages are now regarded as ordinary articles of commerce, their use was then condemned with the same moral fervor that now supports the war on drugs," Stevens writes.
    on Jun 28, 2007 By: John Paul Stevens Source: Raw Story

Word of the Day
ambivalent ambivalent
/æm ˈbɪ və lənt /