owness vs onus :

owness or onus

In Latin onus means “burden.” In English it came to mean “responsibility”: “the onus is on the defense attorney to convince the jury of the defendant’s innocence.” It is often used to mean “blame”: “he bears the onus of having lost the key to the vacation house.”People sometimes mishear this word and turn it into “owness.” This form is also used by some to refer to the opposite of otherness, but that would be “ownness,” with two N’s.

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Definitions

  • n  an onerous or difficult concern
News & Articles

  • Pressure on to finish farm bill
    A day after the Senate passed a five-year, $500 billion farm bill for the second consecutive year, top agriculture officials put the onus on the House not to drop the ball again.
    June 12, 2013 - The Des Moines Register
  • Pressure on to finish farm bill
    A day after the Senate passed a five-year, $500 billion farm bill for the second consecutive year, top agriculture officials put the onus on the House not to drop the ball again.
    June 12, 2013 - The Des Moines Register
  • Grassley puts pressure on House to complete farm bill
    A day after the Senate passed a five-year, $500 billion farm bill for the second consecutive year, Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley put the onus on his colleagues in the House not to drop the ball again.
    June 11, 2013 - The Des Moines Register