mean for vs mean : Common Errors in English

mean for or mean

“I didn’t mean for you to see your present until I’d wrapped it.” This sort of use of “mean for” is a casual pattern inappropriate in written or formal English. Instead, say “I didn’t mean you to see your present. . . .
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  • n  an average of n numbers computed by adding some function of the numbers and dividing by some function of n
  • v  mean or intend to express or convey
    You never understand what I mean!
  • v  have as a logical consequence
    The water shortage means that we have to stop taking long showers
  • v  denote or connote
    `maison' means `house' in French
    An example sentence would show what this word means
  • v  have in mind as a purpose
    I mean no harm
    I only meant to help you
  • v  have a specified degree of importance
    My ex-husband means nothing to me
    Happiness means everything
  • v  intend to refer to
    Yes, I meant you when I complained about people who gossip!
  • v  destine or designate for a certain purpose
    These flowers were meant for you
  • s  approximating the statistical norm or average or expected value
    the mean annual rainfall
  • s  characterized by malice
    in a mean mood
  • s  having or showing an ignoble lack of honor or morality
    taking a mean advantage
    chok'd with ambition of the meaner sort"- Shakespeare
    something essentially vulgar and meanspirited in politics
  • s  excellent
    famous for a mean backhand
  • s  marked by poverty befitting a beggar
    a mean hut
  • s  (used of persons or behavior) characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity
    a mean person
  • s  (used of sums of money) so small in amount as to deserve contempt
  • s  of no value or worth
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