insight vs incite : Common Errors in English

insight or incite

An insight is something you have: an understanding of something, a bright idea about something. To incite is to do something: to stimulate some action or other to be taken. You can never have an incite.

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  • n  clear or deep perception of a situation
  • n  a feeling of understanding
  • n  the clear (and often sudden) understanding of a complex situation
  • n  grasping the inner nature of things intuitively

  • v  give an incentive for action
  • v  provoke or stir up
    incite a riot
  • v  urge on; cause to act
News & Articles

  • The Diner's Guide To Tipping
    There are certain topics that are guaranteed to incite passionate responses. Discussing controversial issues such as religion or politics is bound to land you in, at the least, a spirited debate. Oddly, you'll find that similar vigor and vitriol enters the conversation when discussing tipping etiquette, especially if you bring it up around those in the restaurant industry. The debate over who ...
    June 15, 2013 - Forbes
  • Blaze's Ikner goes from tryout prospect to AFL starter
    SALT LAKE CITY – As is tradition the morning of every road game for the Utah Blaze, players and coaches gathered in the  meeting room of the visiting hotel for an overview of that night’s matchup. Rather than incite inspiration using his own words, c oach Ron James opened the floor to his players, allowing them to opportunity to express their own motivations. read more
    June 15, 2013 - Standard-Examiner
  • Author Hopes to Lead Readers “Into the Calm”
    Gleyder A. Dominquez’s “Despues Llegara La Calma” is a book meant to soothe, not incite. (PRWeb June 13, 2013) Read the full story at
    June 14, 2013 - PRWeb