croissant : Common Errors in English

About croissant

The fanciful legend which attributes the creation of the croissant to Christian bakers celebrating a 17th-century victory over the Turks is widely recounted but almost certainly untrue, since there is no trace of the pastry until a century later. Although its form was probably not influenced by the Islamic crescent, the word croissant most definitely is French for “crescent.” Pastries formed from the same dough into different shapes should not be called “croissants.” If a customer in your bakery asks for a pain au chocolat (PAN oh-show-co-LA), reach for that rectangular pastry usually mislabeled in the US a “chocolate croissant.”

croissant Meaning(s)

  • (n) very rich flaky crescent-shaped roll

croissant in News

  1. Would you pay $40 for a doughnut? What about a cronut?

    Would you pay $40 for a croissant-doughnut hybrid? See video of how they're made.
    on June 14, 2013 Source: The Express-Times

  2. SoHo bakery's crunchy, sweet croissant-doughnut sells out fast

    Oh the pull of that elusive reservation at the hot new restaurant. And double-oh the sweet and fatty decadence of a well-made dessert. Combine the two foodie emotions and you’ve got the Cronut.   There’s a frenzy goin’ on — Manhattan style — for the croissant-doughnut hybrid that went on sale in limited quantities about four weeks ago at the tiny downtown shop of French chef Dominique Ansel.
    on June 12, 2013 Source: Peoria Journal Star

  3. See the 'cronut': A donut-croissant hybrid

    The Cronut. It's the gastronomic love child of the donut and the croissant.
    on June 11, 2013 Source: Detroit Free Press

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