malleability malleability  /ˌmæ li ə ˈbɪ lə ti/

Definition(s):

  • (n) the property of being physically malleable; the property of something that can be worked or hammered or shaped without breaking

Usage(s):

  1. The name of these entrepreneurial gatherings Bloblive aims to reflect the malleability of ideas.
  2. Her mouth always had a malleability that suited her comic needs, but now perhaps from aging, but more likely something less natural it's pursed, tense and mean.
  3. Her mouth always had a malleability that suited her comic needs, but now -- perhaps from aging, but more likely something less natural -- it's pursed, tense and mean.

News

  • History Up Close: Life Lessons from Mt Vesuvius

    Susan Muth puts the malleability of time, life into perspective in new book. (PRWeb July 18, 2013) Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10934943.htm
    on July 18, 2013     Source: PRWeb

Quotes

  1. "The malleability of these feeding circuits by leptin suggest the possibility that the brain's wiring may be different in lean versus obese individuals," Friedman added.
    on Apr 2, 2004 By: Jeffrey Friedman Source: Science Daily (press release)

  2. The Greeks had a word, metis, Audiard says, that means "cunning", and "for them it was a virtue. It was slyness, lies, intelligence, malleability; the qualities of a man who moves through the world and who adapts."
    on Feb 5, 2010 By: Jacques Audiard Source: The Age

  3. Wainwright explained how, with this production, Opera North had taken the show to whole new level: "I wrote this opera to take place in one room in one day and now it's an extremely layered dramatic show. I wanted to impart a sense of malleability...
    on Jul 11, 2009 By: Rufus Wainwright Source: Herald de Paris

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/æm ˈbɪ və lənt /