larva larva  /ˈlɑr və/

Definition(s):

  • (n) the immature free-living form of most invertebrates and amphibians and fish which at hatching from the egg is fundamentally unlike its parent and must metamorphose

Usage(s):

  1. Ill-fed larvae become the small workers; well-fed larvae become soldiers; overfed larvae become queens.
  2. Some killed two of the fish and one larva.
  3. Until 1996, researchers assumed the larvae were carried helplessly on currents, suggesting protected areas should be based on current flows.

News

  1. Peffley: Caterpillars and worms - are they good or bad for your garden?

    Recall from last week that butterflies have a four-stage life cycle and that one stage is a larva.
    on June 12, 2013     Source: Lubbock Avalanche-Journal

  2. Air Force Spray Mission up in the Air | Video

    Last week, the Air Force Reserve was in Williston, spraying the river banks to prevent larva from hatching into mosquitos. The next mission is called adulticiding, which kills off adult mosquitos. But last year, that mission was canceled, and it’s still up in the air for this year.
    on June 7, 2013     Source: KFYR-TV Bismarck

Wiki Images for larva

definition of larva
meaning of larva

Quotes

  1. "We know from last year that West Nile-infected mosquitoes are pretty much spread throughout the county and getting them in the larva stage is the best preventive measure," said Smith.
    on Mar 11, 2004 By: Kevin Smith Source: King of Prussia Courier

  2. Mr Packham said: "Most of the dragonflies' life cycle is spent underwater, first as an egg and then as a larva. The larval stage can last two years or more, whilst flying adults mostly only survive a couple of weeks."
    on May 21, 2010 By: Chris Packham Source: BBC News

  3. "I was born in the larva of the comfortable and complacent bourgeoisie," Mencken wrote of his pillowed life, "encapsulated in affection, and kept fat, saucy and contented. Thus I got through my nonage without acquiring an inferiority...
    on Dec 26, 2006 By: HL Mencken Source: Christian Science Monitor

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