irritated irritated  /ˈɪ rə ˌteɪ təd/

Definition(s):

  • (adj) aroused to impatience or anger

Usage(s):

  1. These dalliances irritated Elsa, who eventually became his wife, but as she told a friend, a genius of her husband's kind could never be irreproachable in every respect.
  2. Almazov, who appeared irritated because prolonging the case would delay his vacation, set the trial for July 7.
  3. Trouble was that all these air germicides smelled bad, or were toxic, or irritated the respiratory tract.

News

  1. No relief for wait at N.M. 528

    COTTONWOOD HAS TO WAIT FOR N.M. 528: Chuck Ahrens emails "I'm irritated by the length of ...
    on June 15, 2013     Source: Albuquerque Journal

  2. Day 5 Ride the Rockies 2013: Rough ride? Sit and talk a spell.

    Usually by day four or five of Ride The Rockies, I start getting irritated with people. I get irritated with people who cut in front of me at the Pancake station.
    on June 14, 2013     Source: Denver Post

  3. Anthony Weiner sounds like not a great boss: "In 2005, he became so irritated with a staff member th

    Anthony Weiner sounds like not a great boss : "In 2005, he became so irritated with a staff member that he threw a salad against the wall ... Another time, arguing with an aide, Mr. Weiner threw his BlackBerry against a wall, then blamed the aide for the broken phone." Read more...        
    on June 14, 2013     Source: Gawker

Quotes

  1. "I wish I could tell you what happened. Just basically out in the field and felt like I had a cramp in my ankle, which is the most strange thing ever," Youkilis said. "Somehow I irritated the capsule, so my ankle locked up. I'll be good to go...
    on Jul 6, 2010 By: Kevin Youkilis Source: CBSSports.com

  2. "That kind of irritated me," Tebow said. "I told the coach to give me the ball because I really wanted to hit somebody."
    on Nov 29, 2008 By: Tim Tebow Source: USA Today

  3. Sir Menzies said he had become "irritated and frustrated" at the sniping and conceded that Gordon Brown's decision to rule out a snap election had contributed to his decision.
    on Oct 16, 2007 By: Sir Menzies Campbell Source: Times Online

Word of the Day
cursory cursory
/ˈkɜr sə ri /