inroad inroad  /ˈɪn ˌroʊd/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) an encroachment or intrusion
  2. (n) an invasion or hostile attack

Usage(s):

  1. In 1989, AIDS made a new inroad into the mainland, penetrating China around the Burmese border.
  2. In 1989, AIDS made a new inroad into the mainland, penetrating China around the Burmese border.

News

  • It’s Official: Legendary Partners With NBCU In 5-Year Deal Starting In 2014

    The worst-kept secret in town is a five-year deal that includes access to NBCUniversal ‘s theme park business, something former partner Warner Bros could not provide, as well as to parent Comcast’s “Symphony” initiative that will give its projects promotional support across all of the company’s divisions. And Universal will have an inroad to China thanks to Legendary ‘s recent deal with China ...
    on July 10, 2013     Source: Deadline Hollywood

Quotes

  1. "There is no effective way to meaningfully reduce emissions without negatively impacting a large part of an economy," Greenspan wrote. "Net, it is a tax. If the cap is low enough to make a meaningful inroad into CO 2 emissions, permits will...
    on Sep 20, 2007 By: Alan Greenspan Source: Business Media Institute

  2. "It's not an easy pitch but you have to keep plugging away," said Sidebottom. "As Sri Lanka showed, if you can get an early inroad you can maybe get two or three."
    on Dec 10, 2007 By: Ryan Sidebottom Source: ic Wales

  3. "This result would constitute a serious inroad on Parliament's policy choice to maintain the rule against spousal incompetency," wrote Charron.
    on Jun 15, 2007 By: Louise Charron Source: Canada.com

Word of the Day
affectation affectation
/ˌæ fɛk ˈteɪ ʃən /