ingratiate ingratiate  /ɪŋ ˈɡreɪ ʃi ˌeɪt/

Definition(s):

  • (v) gain favor with somebody by deliberate efforts

Usage(s):

  1. Seeking means to ingratiate themselves with Benito Mussolini, certain zealous Italians have founded the Action Committee for the Universality of Rome.
  2. Seeking means to ingratiate themselves with Benito Mussolini, certain zealous Italians have founded the Action Committee for the Universality of Rome.
  3. Coraline doesn't try to ingratiate; it just looms, like a cemetery gate, daring curious souls to tiptoe in and fend for themselves.

News

  • Sean McCorkle taps Mariusz Pudzianowski at KSW 23, declares Poland favorite country over U.S.

    It took Sean McCorkle less than two minutes to defeat the five-time World's Strongest Man, Mariusz Pudzianowski . But what McCorkle said afterward was just as memorable as his victory. After he'd closed out Pudzianowski with a kimura, McCorkle was interviewed about the fight. And while trying to ingratiate himself to the local fans at Ergo Arena in Gdansk, Poland as well as the promotion ...
    on June 9, 2013     Source: SB Nation

Quotes

  1. "If he thinks he's going to ingratiate himself to his critics, he's sorely mistaken, and unfortunately, the only friends he had, he just lost," said Dan Bartlett, who served as White House counsellor.
    on May 28, 2008 By: Dan Bartlett Source: Reuters UK

  2. "In an effort to ingratiate our country with the Arab world, this administration has shown a troubling eagerness to undercut our allies and friends," said House Republican Whip Eric Cantor, the only Jewish Republican in the House of Representatives.
    on Mar 15, 2010 By: Eric Cantor Source: AFP

  3. Mr Moore said even the "normally sensible" senior Labour Cabinet minister Phil Goff had joined the chorus, "hoping to ingratiate himself with left-wing MPs for later" - a reference to Mr Goff's leadership aspirations.
    on Aug 29, 2007 By: Mike Moore Source: Stuff.co.nz

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