indelicate indelicate  /ɪn ˈdɛ lɪ kət/

Definition(s):

  1. (adj) in violation of good taste even verging on the indecent
  2. (adj) lacking propriety and good taste in manners and conduct
  3. (adj) verging on the indecent

Synonym(s)

Usage(s):

  1. DBS electrodes measure just a millimeter thick, and implanting them is a painstaking procedure that begins with the indelicate task of boring a hole through the skull.
  2. But, though they use the word regularly in covering dog shows, newspapers and v:ire services were not so indelicate as to call it a bitch.
  3. A few television newscasts, though, avoided mention of the indelicate word.

News

  • MLB Star Roasts Commentator Who Blamed Him for Horrific Injury

    MLB pitcher Brandon McCarthy suffered a horrific injury last season when he was nailed in the head with a line drive McCarthy somehow avoided longterm major damage and is back playing this season, but an MLB Network commentator brought the scary moment up again on Wednesday in decidedly indelicate fashion We'll let @HeardOnMLBT, a Twitter account poking fun at the often inane things said on MLB ...
    on July 12, 2013     Source: Mashable

Quotes

  1. Before Hernandez's shot at Carter, play-by-play man Gary Cohen said: "Regardless of what happens, you can't be any more indelicate or graceless than Gary Carter was in saying the things he said about being available to take over the job. I just...
    on May 26, 2008 By: Gary Cohen Source: Seattle Times

  2. In his piece, which led the NBC Nightly News, Gregory recalled: "Biden, who admits he has a tendency to bloviate, has made indelicate remarks before. Last year speaking about Indian-Americans:" Viewers saw video from C-SPAN, of Biden in a crowd,...
    on Jan 31, 2007 By: David Gregory Source: NewsBusters (blog)

  3. "Some of it's indelicate," Harrison says with a laugh. "It contains actresses' names and dirty stuff. Stacks of it. He writes beautiful letters."
    on Jan 17, 2010 By: Jim Harrison Source: Detroit Free Press

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