haiku haiku  /ˈhaɪ ku/

Definition(s):

  • (n) an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines

Usage(s):

  1. Lesson on page twoQuicklylet us get startedMindstop wanderingThat is a haiku, a 500-year-old Japanese poetic form whose.
  2. Haiku are not stiffly formulated commentary or instructional verses, nor do they seek to express an opinion or draw rational conclusions.
  3. Just like when you write a sonnet or haiku, there are rules you have to abide by.

News

  1. Poetic license

    The dedication of the “Peace Is a Haiku Song” mural at 1425 Christian St. occurred Sunday. With verbal contributions from, among others, Philadelphia’s Poet Laureate Sonia Sanchez; Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; and Charles Albert Tindley, the namesake of South of South’s... [This is a summary. To read the full article on SouthPhillyReview.com, click the headline above.]
    on June 14, 2013     Source: South Philly Review

  2. Free iPad presentation app keeps it simple

    Haiku Deck lets you tell your story in pictures rather than text-laden slides. It's easy to share your iPad presentations and export them to PowerPoint and Keynote. Originally posted at How To
    on June 13, 2013     Source: CNET

  3. Haiku for a Hawaiian rooster

    Hawaiian rooster crowing lustily at dawn. Paradise; no sleep. (Roosters aren’t really the state bird of Hawaii, it just seems that way. Click on comments and submit your own Hawaii haiku.)
    on June 11, 2013     Source: Seattle Times

Wiki Images for haiku

definition of haiku

Quotes

  1. "It's like going from free verse to writing rhymed haiku" is how Oren described his transition from opinionated historian to diplomat.
    on Aug 17, 2009 By: Michael Oren Source: Jewish Telegraphic Agency

  2. (Moody fans and the curious can subscribe to Electric Lit's Twitter feed at its Twitter page.) "It really was like writing Haiku," says Moody of the story, which takes the form of imaginary liner notes.
    on Nov 24, 2009 By: Rick Moody Source: Entertainment Weekly

  3. "That show is such a very layered piece," Andreas says. "It took a while for it to get into my bones. I found it very gratifying. It's so spare. I want to say it's like haiku theater, but it isn't really. You do use few words to convey a lot....
    on Sep 27, 2007 By: Christine Andreas Source: Inside Bay Area

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