glacially glacially

Definition(s):

  • (adv) by a glacier

Usage(s):

  1. The little companies that are vying for deals say they are being stymied by an opaque and glacially slow contracting process.
  2. Makes you wonder what would have happened if she'd been cast as Hermione: she's more sweet and real-looking than the waspish, glacially pretty Emma Watson.
  3. Web shopping can be glacially slow, and the sites difficult to navigate.

News

  1. A long way from Stonewall, and sometimes a slog

    WASHINGTON (AP) — From Stonewall in New York in 1969 to the marble walls of the Supreme Court, the push to advance gay rights has moved forward, often glacially but recently at a quickening pace. A look at episodes in the modern history of that movement and how attitudes have changed along the way in the larger culture:
    on June 27, 2013     Source: Associated Press via Yahoo! News

  2. A long, incremental advance in push for gay equality now comes at a quickening pace

    WASHINGTON — From Stonewall in New York in 1969 to the marble walls of the Supreme Court, the push to advance gay rights has moved forward, often glacially but recently at a quickening pace.
    on June 27, 2013     Source: Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune

Quotes

  1. The New York Times' Ben Brantley said: "The show left me stone cold. The leading performers make their entrances and exits glacially, in robotic profile, across the back of the stage. When they speak, they often find themselves competing with...
    on Oct 17, 2008 By: Ben Brantley Source: Showbiz Spy

  2. "She is the most emotionally expressive actor about a certain kind of extreme feeling," Mr. Hare said of Ms. Redgrave in a phone interview from London. "And one of Joan's extraordinary qualities is this glacially perfect prose which contains...
    on May 25, 2006 By: David Hare Source: New York Times

  3. In July 1940, Ickes noted in his diary that the "glacially lofty Sumner Welles objected strenuously to putting petroleum products and scrap iron on the list for licenses."
    on Mar 12, 2010 By: Harold Ickes Source: NPR

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fathom fathom
/ˈfæ ðəm /