flycatcher flycatcher  /f ˈlaɪ ˌkæ tʃər/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) any of a large group of small songbirds that feed on insects taken on the wing
  2. (n) large American birds that characteristically catch insects on the wing

Usage(s):

  1. The dinner in the same capital dominated by a singleminded flycatcher who hovered behind Carter until swat!he nailed his prey and plucked it daintily from the linen.
  2. From the great crested flycatcher all the way to the least grebe, they totted up tally after tally.
  3. Or they were in southeastern Arizona, stalking the violet-crowned hummingbird and sulphur-bellied flycatcher, all the while praying for a glimpse of the rare eared trogon.

News

  • Phoebes Take On UFOs

    The dads take fatherhood seriously, too Cathryn Williams Freeburger Phoebes are inconspicuous in plumage , but you will hear them from wooded areas loud and clear: FEEE-bee-bee-bee! Eastern phoebes, part of the flycatcher family, swoop down from understory branches to catch moths, mosquitoes and other Undesirable Flitting Objects. The generic name for flycatchers, Empidomax, is from the Greek ...
    on June 13, 2013     Source: Bay Weekly

Quotes

  1. "In one case, she demanded that the determined nesting range of the Southwest Willow Flycatcher be shrunk from a 2.1 mile radius to 1.8 miles, so that it would not cross into the state of California, where her husband's family owned a ranch,"...
    on May 1, 2007 By: Ron Wyden Source: Environment News Service

  2. "Eradication of this unquenchable shrub will save water, lower salinity levels and create a more congenial habitat for the Southwest Willow Flycatcher and a number of other riparian species in Colorado and across the West," Allard said. "This...
    on Oct 12, 2006 By: Wayne Allard Source: Cherry Creek News

  3. "The effect on indigenous birds has been drastic," Fiona Reid told BBC News Online. "Numerous species, such as the African paradise flycatcher and many sunbirds, have virtually disappeared from Dar es Salaam gardens."
    on Nov 11, 2003 By: Fiona Reid Source: BBC News

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languish languish
/ˈlæŋɡ wɪʃ /