fandango fandango  /fæn ˈdæŋ ˌɡoʊ/

Definition(s):

  • (n) a provocative Spanish courtship dance in triple time; performed by a man and a woman playing castanets

Usage(s):

  1. TONY AND HUGH RODHAM, THE brothers of First Lady Hillary Clinton, prepared for this week with only the dimmest understanding of the Washington Inaugural fandango.
  2. By August, the dark horse had enough support to generate 2,587 votes at the Ames straw poll, a fund-raising fandango for the Iowa GOP at which candidates pay to have their .
  3. The general blurred impression given by the picture is like this: Mae Murraylarge mountains Mae Murraymidnight love trysts Mae Murraya weird fandango by somebody .

News

  • WWE Worst of the Week: Stephanie, Vince and More

    Are you ready for Payback? I hope so, because WWE sure wasn't. The company announced most matches for the pay-per-view just this past week. Somebody must have been too busy writing comedy skits for fake concussion man and his boss/father in law, and his boss/wife. It's too bad that none of them are actually going to be on the pay-per-view. Also this week, we find out Fandango is out of action ...
    on June 16, 2013     Source: Bleacher Report

Wiki Images for fandango

definition of fandango

Quotes

  1. "It depicts small miniatures, each a picture of the rural life in Castile: things like dancing a fandango, or a peaceful afternoon by the lakeside, a party in a village, the dawn, a wedding, and so on," Pepe Romero says. "They're wonderful...
    on Mar 27, 2008 By: Pepe Romero Source: South Bend Tribune (subscription)

  2. They lost Tim Schafer, noted for "work on Day of The Tentacle, Full Throttle, and Grim Fandango" who's currently doing work on Psychonauts.
    on Aug 13, 2004 By: Tim Schafer Source: Slashdot

  3. Quite how cows, opera and ballroom dancing all came to be mixed up is a complex story, but as Revel Horwood explains: "It's a gift for a choreographer, because it's packed with big, Latin show tunes from the fandango to the samba with just a hint of...
    on Mar 23, 2006 By: Craig Revel Horwood Source: guardian.co.uk

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