faintly faintly  /ˈfeɪnt li/

Definition(s):

  • (adv) to a faint degree or weakly perceived

Usage(s):

  1. Before this year, blogs were a curiosity, a cult phenomenon, a faintly embarrassing hobby on the order of ham radio and stamp collecting.
  2. There is something faintly ridiculous about such a citybilly, yet Dylan is the newest hero of an art that has made a fetish out of authenticity.
  3. But in 2002 the idea that someone like West could be a successful rapper was faintly absurd.

News

  1. Xbox Live will offer two free games per month starting July, includes Assassin's Creed 2 and Halo 3

    Kicking off Microsoft's announcements, the company has said that Xbox Live will start offering free Xbox 360 games for its paying members, starting this July. In the run-up to the Xbox One's launch, you'll be able to pick up two titles each month, gratis -- if you're an Xbox Live Gold member. If it sounds familiar, it's because it sounds faintly similar to what Sony's PS Plus has offered its ...
    on June 10, 2013     Source: Engadget

  2. ‘...to the welfare of those in my care’

    When thinking about nurses, older Americans probably imagine a woman clad in a white dress and white nylon stockings, an odd looking white cap pinned to her head, scurrying through hospital corridors with a clipboard and a ball point pen, her thick-soled white shoes squeaking faintly as she hastens from room to room. Younger Americans on the other hand, might picture a woman, or even a man for ...
    on June 10, 2013     Source: Washington Times-Herald

Quotes

  1. Mr Rudd said the factional allegiances of his front bench "were not even faintly relevant" to his decision making.
    on Nov 29, 2007 By: Kevin Rudd Source: Sydney Morning Herald

  2. "It is impossible for me to imagine Bob Zoellick doing anything even faintly improper," Mr Sutton said. "I find it impossible to imagine him abusing his power in unethical ways."
    on May 29, 2007 By: Jim Sutton Source: Stuff.co.nz

  3. But Alan Johnson, the education secretary, said: "Any argument that there is evidence women are letting down their children by going out to work is faintly ludicrous."
    on Apr 4, 2007 By: Alan Johnson Source: guardian.co.uk

Word of the Day
maxim maxim
/ˈmæk səm /