equivocate equivocate  /ɪ ˈkwɪ və ˌkeɪt/

Definition(s):

  • (v) be deliberately ambiguous or unclear in order to mislead or withhold information

Derived Word(s)

Usage(s):

  1. On a few issues, the commission will not equivocate.
  2. I am in earnestI will not equivocateI will not excuseI will not retreat a single inchand I will be heard! Thus spoke William LloydGarrison at a crisis.
  3. Trapped between the leadership in Moscow and a broad-based popular movement at home, the Armenian Communist Party has tried to equivocate.

News

  • Greg Cote’s Week 5 NFL picks

    I could sugarcoat or equivocate, but what would be the point. I had another lousy week, OK? Had the Saints-Dolphins game pegged and had Browns-with-points over Bengals, but not a lot else went right. I did get unlucky, with at least four teams I’d picked blowing late leads. (Thanks for that, choking Texans and miserable Matt Schaub! Not that I’m bitter). Now hopefully some of that luck will turn ...
    on October 4, 2013     Source: Miami Herald

Quotes

  1. "I think that the pro-life position is one of the important aspects or fundamentals of the Republican Party," McCain told Hayes. "And I also feel that -- and I'm not trying to equivocate here -- that Americans want us to work together. You...
    on Aug 13, 2008 By: John McCain Source: Washington Post

  2. These were "shocking conclusions to read and shocking words to have to say", Cameron said. "But you do not defend the British Army by defending the indefensible. There is no point trying to soften or equivocate what is in the report. It is...
    on Jun 15, 2010 By: David Cameron Source: The Guardian

  3. "I will listen very carefully to them in terms of the pace, the intelligence, the tactics of withdrawal," Obama said. "But I will not equivocate on my strategic point that we need to withdraw as deliberately and as responsibly as we can."
    on Mar 12, 2008 By: Barack Obama Source: FOXNews

Word of the Day
untenable untenable
/ən ˈtɛ nə bəl /