engender engender  /ɛn ˈdʒɛn dər/

Definition(s):

  1. (v) call forth
  2. (v) make children

Usage(s):

  1. The idea of this meeting is to engender peace and harmony among the warring nations.
  2. Dictators often use the state machinery to engender loyalty and fear among their people.
  3. Off late, the policies of the government have engendered a lot of controversy.

News

  • Pricing And Independent Games Policy Still Loom Large For Microsoft's Xbox One

    With Microsoft's striking reversal of its controversial used games and DRM policies, a lot of pundits are declaring the next-gen console war back on. Microsoft may have used two major press events mostly to engender the rage of the internet and the hardcore gaming community, but now it's listening to fans and people can get back to evaluating it and Sony's PS4 on their merits alone.
    on June 21, 2013     Source: Forbes

Quotes

  1. "Even so, we will continue to use Black-Scholes when we are estimating our financial-statement liability for long-term equity puts. The formula represents conventional wisdom and any substitute that I might offer would engender extreme...
    on Mar 1, 2009 By: Buffett Source: USA Today

  2. Romney said such a move wouldn't "engender the kind of working relationship you hope to have between the two branches of government."
    on Nov 21, 2007 By: Mitt Romney Source: Forbes

  3. "We must now adapt to meet the taste of today's young generation," Rogge said. "For our Movement to remain relevant into the next decade and beyond we must engender the interest of young people in the thrill of sport and reduce the...
    on Jul 4, 2007 By: Jacques Rogge Source: The Age

Word of the Day
periphery periphery
/pə ˈrɪ fə ri /