condescend condescend  /ˌkɑn dɪ ˈsɛnd/

Definition(s):

  1. (v) behave in a patronizing and condescending manner
  2. (v) do something that one considers to be below one's dignity
  3. (v) debase oneself morally, act in an undignified, unworthy, or dishonorable way
  4. (v) treat condescendingly

Usage(s):

  1. His pompous and condescending tone put his protege off so much that he did not come to the office thereafter.
  2. To think that we are so smart that we can retrain the audience, that's an awfully elitist, condescending, and frankly old perspective.
  3. His regular appearances on Newsnight programme have been criticised as aggressive, intimidating, condescending and irreverent, and applauded as tough and incisive.

News

  • Walk like an Egyptian

    From the comfort of Midtown Manhattan, it’s easy to condescend to the Egyptians over what the Arab Spring has meant for their unhappy land. Only two years ago, the crowds cheered — “joyful pandemonium,” The Washington Post called it — when the army that had backed Hosni Mubarak for decades finally...
    on August 23, 2013     Source: New York Post

Quotes

  1. A major report ordered by David Cameron said the Government's approach to working women had been to "compel, to lecture and to condescend".
    on Feb 14, 2008 By: David Cameron Source: Daily Mail

  2. "We don't want to condescend, we don't want to patronize," Kilroy-Silk said at a press conference in London. "We have the trust of the British people."
    on Feb 2, 2005 By: Robert Kilroy-Silk Source: Bloomberg

  3. "These are worlds I love," said Nelson, who was himself raised Jewish in Oklahoma, "and I think what was most important was never to condescend. If you pursue whatever world you're depicting truthfully and specifically, then condescension...
    on Mar 27, 2010 By: Tim Blake Nelson Source: Los Angeles Times

Word of the Day
cynic cynic
/ˈsɪ nɪk /