broadly broadly  /b ˈrɔd li/

Definition(s):

  1. (adv) without regard to specific details or exceptions
  2. (adv) in a wide fashion

Synonym(s)

Usage(s):

  1. More broadly, the ruling Communist Party is having a difficult time coming to terms publicly with the idea that the one-child policy has been a failure and should be scrapped.
  2. Things, broadly speaking, used to be invented by a small, shadowy lite.
  3. The phrase has become more broadly the term for a particular category of campaign tactics and has even become a verb.

News

  1. Negotiation deadline is Thursday

    The New Hampshire Senate and House support allowing seriously ill people to use marijuana in their medical treatment, but they don't agree on how broadly to soften drug laws.
    on June 16, 2013     Source: WMUR New Hampshire

  2. NH lawmakers negotiating medical marijuana changes

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The New Hampshire Senate and House support allowing seriously ill people to use marijuana in their medical treatment, but they don't agree on how broadly to soften drug laws.        
    on June 16, 2013     Source: Boston Globe

  3. Dollar broadly higher vs. rivals ahead of U.S. data

    Investing.com - The U.S. dollar was broadly higher against the other major currencies on Friday, as investors awaited the release of U.S. data later in the day, after Thursday's economic reports
    on June 14, 2013     Source: Nasdaq

Quotes

  1. "It's time for those banks to fulfill their responsibility to help ensure a wider recovery, a more secure system, and more broadly shared prosperity," Obama said in his weekly radio address, his latest plea for banks to do more for the larger...
    on Oct 24, 2009 By: Barack Obama Source: Washington Post

  2. "Consistent with the legislation, any equity the government purchases through a broadly available equity program would be on a non-voting basis, except with respect to the market-standard terms to protect our rights as investors," Paulson said.
    on Oct 10, 2008 By: Henry Paulson Source: Reuters UK

  3. "Moreover, the adverse impact of a default would not have been confined to the financial system but would have been felt broadly in the real economy through its effects on asset values and credit availability," Bernanke said.
    on Apr 3, 2007 By: Ben Bernanke Source: CanadianBusiness.com

Word of the Day
repudiate repudiate
/ri ˈpju di ˌeɪt /