bluster bluster  /b ˈlə stər/

Definition(s):

  1. (n) a swaggering show of courage
  2. (n) a violent gusty wind
  3. (n) vain and empty boasting
  4. (n) noisy confusion and turbulence
  5. (v) blow hard; be gusty, as of wind
  6. (v) show off
  7. (v) act in an arrogant, overly self-assured, or conceited manner

Usage(s):

  1. In Chasing Amy, he found the poignancy in male bluster, the warmth in a guy's rivalry with and veneration of that other species, The Girl.
  2. But McCain also lost, because of the bluster and false analogies of his comments.
  3. That is a threat that doesn't yield easily to the empty bluster of neocons--indeed, it was accelerated by US bluster.

News

  1. Tropical Storm Barry bears down on coast

    MIAMI (AP) — Forecasters say Tropical Storm Barry is very close to Mexico’s Gulf Coast and nearly set to bluster ashore with winds and drenching rains. read more
    on June 21, 2013     Source: The Times Record

  2. Tropical Storm Barry bears down on Mexico's coast

    MIAMI (AP) — Forecasters say Tropical Storm Barry is very close to Mexico's Gulf Coast and nearly set to bluster ashore with winds and drenching rains.
    on June 20, 2013     Source: Idaho Press-Tribune

Quotes

  1. Before a crowd of thousands gathered in front of the Old State Capitol, Obama said Biden was "what many others pretend to be - a statesman with sound judgment who doesn't have to hide behind bluster to keep America strong."
    on Aug 23, 2008 By: Barack Obama Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune

  2. "I would consider that to be bluster from the foreign minister of Russia," White House spokeswoman Dana Perino said. "We will ignore it."
    on Aug 14, 2008 By: Dana Perino Source: FOXNews

  3. "We frankly believe this is a lot of bluster," said Scott Paul, executive director of the Alliance for American Manufacturing, a union coalition that backs the provision.
    on Feb 4, 2009 By: Scott Paul Source: International Herald Tribune

Word of the Day
subordinate subordinate
/sə ˈbɔr də ˌneɪt /