amuse amuse  /ə ˈmjuz/

Definition(s):

  1. (v) make (somebody) laugh
  2. (v) occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion

Synonym(s)

Derived Word(s)

Usage(s):

  1. I wanted to write good plays, to grip as well as amuse.
  2. He also had a cheeky rebelliousness toward authority, which led one headmaster to expel him and another to amuse history by saying that he would never amount to much.
  3. I think that has been very beneficial to their development, because they amuse themselves without resorting to the passive phenomenon of TV watching.

News

  1. Make a statement with chicken coops

    To make an original statement with yard art, think beyond fountains, globes and statuary. Add chicken coops to be chic. These outbuildings can amuse and enhance while providing shelter for the family fowl.
    on June 20, 2013     Source: The Daily Reflector

  2. Twins and rubber bands

    Twin babies amuse themselves with the simple things in life. …
    on June 18, 2013     Source: WGN Radio Chicago

  3. MLB suspensions are serious business, but Dodgers get a laugh

    Three players, Manager Don Mattingly and coach Mark McGwire are suspended after brawl, and Arizona pitcher Ian Kennedy gets 10 games. But some of league's actions amuse Dodgers. Three players, Manager Don Mattingly and coach Mark McGwire are suspended after brawl, and Arizona pitcher Ian Kennedy gets 10 games. But some of league's actions amuse Dodgers.        
    on June 15, 2013     Source: Los Angeles Times

Quotes

  1. In listening to Stevens' recount his presence at the 1932 World Series game known for Ruth's "called shot," Kmiec said, "It was very clear that the justice was very amused to amuse us with his age."
    on Nov 29, 2008 By: Douglas Kmiec Source: International Herald Tribune

  2. Accepting the award, Ms. Mantel said, "I had to interest the historians, I had to amuse the jaded palate of the critical establishment and most of all I had to capture the imagination of the general reader."
    on Oct 6, 2009 By: Hilary Mantel Source: New York Times

  3. "I admire her writing very much," Hazzard told The Associated Press. "Her intention is not to amuse. She's a serious writer who deals with thing she feels very, very strongly about."
    on Oct 11, 2007 By: Shirley Hazzard Source: Washington Post

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