stress on vs feel stress : Common Errors in English

About stress on vs feel stress

“Stress on” is commonly misused to mean “to experience stress” as in “I’m stressing on the term paper I have to do.” Still informal, but better, is “I'm stressed about. . . .” In a more formal context you could express the same idea by saying “I'm anxious about. . . .”It is perfectly fine, however, to say that you place stress on something, with “stress” being a noun rather than a verb.

stress on in News

  • Military roots nourish Elgin woman's veteran advocacy

    Military service places a stress on families. No one knows that better than Joyce Carrasco of Elgin. Carrasco grew up in a military home, has two adult children currently serving in the military and sees the burden that can put on her grandchildren. "On my father's side, there were 11 children and all 11 children served in the military," says Carrasco. "The story goes that my grandmother had 11 ...
    on June 13, 2013 Source: Daily Herald

feel stress in News

  1. Don’t Worry, Be Happy: Ways to Ease Your Stress

    I was trying not to feel stressed as the traffic backed up and then stopped. I was, after all, on my way to a seminar entitled “Stress, Anxiety and Depression.”
    on June 10, 2013 Source: Valley News

  2. Quinn on Nutrition: Stress and nutrition

    I was trying not to feel stressed as the traffic backed up and then stopped. I was, after all, on my way to a seminar entitled “Stress, Anxiety and Depression.” I took a deep breath — which was later confirmed as a great stress reliever — and was thankful I had allowed extra time to get to my destination.
    on June 9, 2013 Source: The Pantagraph

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